Resident Profile: Jodie Caller

jodiecallerrisingstarssports-1Jodie Caller is 22 years old and is a Great Britain Judo athlete from Nether Heyford. Her judo career started when she was 8 years old. She has been part of the Great Britain squad and competing internationally since she was 14 years old.  In 2016, she unfortunately tore her ACL at the European University Games in Croatia.  Jodie had an operation and 2 years of recovery to get back to competitive judo. Jodie is now back to competing at the level she was before the injury and is continuing her judo career. Jodie has also been competing alongside studying and is now pleased to have graduated with a first class degree in Sports Coaching Practice from the University of Wolverhampton. She will now be dedicating the next 12 months to her judo career.

Her previous judo results include: 7 x British Champion | European University Games Champion | Cadet European Championships – Bronze medal | Several times European Cup Medallist

Jodie has funded her way through these competitions over the last year to get herself into the top 3 in the country, but the next goal is to medal at The Commonwealth Games in 2022.  Each trip cost approximately £300 for her to attend. In order to qualify for the big tournaments, Jodie has to compete at various events around the world in order to gain enough points to be eligible for selection. Jodie receives no funding support from UK sport or the British judo association. Jodie is looking for any donations to help her to self-fund to these events to continue her extensive judo career. Any donations will be greatly appreciated. For more information visit:

www.gofundme.com/f/help-gb-judo-player-jodie-caller-achieve-her-dream

RisingStarSportsNetherHeyfordOctober2019

Rising Stars Sports are running sports camps at The Bliss Charity School in Nether Heyford during the school holidays with lead coach Jodie Caller October Half-Term Camps.

Monday 28th October: Gymnastics day | Thursday 31st October: Football day

Ages: 4-11 years old | Start: 9:30 am | Finish: 4:00 pm

Price: £18 per day (Early drop off is available at 8:30 am for an additional £2 per day)

Book early to avoid disappointment: risingstarssports@hotmail.com | 07428 411384

www.risingstarssports.co.uk
www.facebook.com/risingstars57
twitter.com/risingstars57

Heyford Singers – October 2019

HeyfordSingersOct2019

I love this time of year, as summer slides into autumn. The gardens are gently
fading with late summer flowers glowing like jewels, leaves are beginning to turn as trees claim their time of seasonal glory. Fields have yielded up their harvest, whilst the hedgerows and orchards have ripe pickings for jams and jellies, chutneys and cider. It is a nostalgic time as well. The last over of the summer cricket matches have been bowled and the eight week Proms season has ended. We look back and hold fast to fond memories of the summer days, but so we also look forward to the new beginnings that the autumn brings.

The youngest generation has, or is about to, take the next steps on their learning journeys. Pre-school, nursery, primary or secondary school, university or the working world. We have several family members embarking on these “next steps” – we wish them, and everyone else, much happiness and success in their new adventures. The cricket season may be over but the Rugby World Cup is upon us, and the anthem at the top will be heard time and time again as we switch on to watch, cheer, applaud, and hopefully not commiserate. Add to this the various national anthems that will be proudly played and sung too, and then we have a small feast of musical experiences!

Which brings me very nicely to Heyford Singers and music. Our autumn rehearsal season began on 6th September with an Open Evening. We had expected one or two new members, we had hoped for maybe a few more, but we were absolutely thrilled to welcome thirteen new singers! Mary had prepared a lovely mixture of songs for the first evening, two warm up tunes, a medley of songs from Oliver, “Feeling Groovy” by Simon and Garfunkel, and then two songs to be included in the forthcoming Christmas concert. It was lovely evening, warm and welcoming, relaxed and fun, made especially so by sharing it with new friends. And what is more they all claimed to have thoroughly enjoyed their initial session and have continued to come!

So we look forward with excitement and anticipation. I have tried to avoid much
mention of winter’s great festival as that will follow in good time, but for your diaries the Heyford Singers’ Christmas concert is Friday 13th and Saturday 14th December and plans are being made for a village “Carols on the Green” for Friday 20th December. Further details of both events will follow in due course.

But for now, the sun is shining, the sky is cloudless and the garden beckons!

Jill Langrish

____________________________________________________________________________________

If you would like to find out more, visit the Heyford Singers page or our website:

www.heyfordsingers.org

 alternatively come along to one of our rehearsals in Nether Heyford Village Hall.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Nether Heyford Community Wildlife Area – October 2019

View from The Wildlife Patch

The heads of Ivy in the bordering Roadside Hedge are now in full bloom and providing a bounty of nectar for a variety of insects. Right now there are several species of Wasp, Hover Fly, Bee, Butterfly and many more insects, including massive European Hornets which are really just huge Wasps. On warmer nights, nocturnal insects, especially moths will be found on the same flowers.

Elsewhere, we have cut down as much of the long grass as we are going to. This has been collected and put in heaps. One of these has a cavity underneath which will hopefully be taken up by a Hedgehog.

Grass has been cut and removed from the area where the pond will be. Most of the area exposed thus will be cut quite short and covered with spoil from pond digging. This will be planted with a wildflower /grass mixture though some will be kept as bare earth. This being essential for some solitary Bee and Wasp species.

Early in October we will sow the Cornfield Annual patch with the same mixture as the new ground and those patches now covered with plastic sheeting will be stripped bare and sown with Cornfield Annuals. The seating/picnic area will be sown with a Wildflower Lawn seed.

When the pond is in we will need to provide a barrier to keep small, unattended children from the pond. One of my Grandchildren, when younger, tried using my garden pond net as a trampoline which was not good idea. I think we will need to put a fence round the pond with a gate for access. This should be much safer.

Molehills are usually very much in evidence at this time of year. They live singly and feed mainly on a diet of Earthworms. Each mole digs series of subterranean tunnels which it “cruises” along, picking up any worms which drop into the tunnels. Earthworms migrate up and down vertically in the soil according to outside conditions. For example they go deeper in times of drought, then Moles dig their burrows at a lower level to trap them. When they dig these new tunnels they push the spoil to the surface to create Molehills.

I know that some gardeners believe moles eat vegetable roots from underground. This belief is erroneous. Moles cannot digest any form of vegetable matter, they are not rodents and just do not have the dentition to gnaw roots. Moles need to eat every few hours and dine EXCLUSIVELY on earthworms and insects. Having said that I did find a beetroot on my allotment that had been well and truly gnawed below ground underneath was what appeared to be the top end of a Mole Tunnel. A closer look at the damage showed very clearly the double tooth marks of a Rodent. This was no doubt the work of a Brown Rat which had modified a moles tunnel to burrow up to my Beet.

Dave Musson

Revitalising the Allotments – October 2019

About two years ago we began to despair that the main allotment site in Nether Heyford was going to rack and ruin. Those conscientious souls who kept their plots in good order were often fighting a losing a battle, as weeds from abandoned plots encroached onto their veggie beds. Trying to find a way through the site involved hacking your way through a jungle of tall grass and vicious brambles and at the same time trying to negotiate your way round abandoned car tyres, scrap metal and various wooden obstacles. The allotments, taken as a whole, looked a mess.

Fast forward to the present and what a change has occurred. Thanks to the support of the Parish Council, a group of volunteers have been able to make the allotments not only look good but once more become productive – in so many ways.

A section on the site that had long been abandoned was cleared and, with generous support from local businesses, organisations and individual residents, over thirty heritage fruit trees were purchased and planted. As we approach the first anniversary of that planting, I am pleased to report that they are thriving and have put on a considerable amount of new growth. In the next few years we look forward to harvesting our first crop and inviting you to share in this bounty.

Maintaining good pathways around the allotment site had always been a problem. Several allotment holders went above and beyond their remit of keeping their own area in order and often mowed whole sections near to their allotment. But that became the exception, not the rule. Over the past two years that has changed and thanks to volunteers and more individual allotment holders, the pathways are in good order. No longer do you hazard life and limb when you enter the allotments.

Following on from the success of the community orchard, a “community jam patch” has been created, again using several abandoned plots and utilising fruit bushes that have been rescued in the clearance work. We try to ensure that nothing goes to waste. Plans are afoot to extend this by including a “community cutting garden”, made up of annual and perennial flowers.

Another, long abandoned area of the allotments, has been turned over to a “wild area”. This is not an excuse to simply abandon land but is a carefully managed space that includes a wild flower area, nesting boxes for birds and smaller mammals as well as areas for tall grasses to flourish and a host of butterflies, beetles and other mini-beasts to thrive. Pathways have been mown through the area for safe access and a clearly defined perimeter rope has been fixed to posts to show where the area starts and finishes. As this is an area of sensitive growth and development the wildlife volunteers would ask that anyone seeking to visit first contacts one of them to arrange a convenient time. The next development for this area will be the creation of a wildlife pond.

Having a place to sit and eat lunch after a hard session on the allotment or for just taking the opportunity to sit and admire the orchard and the surrounding allotments, requires a community seating area. Again, thanks to the generosity of villagers and fellow allotmenteers we have been able to create a green space with tables and chairs. It was a joy to be able to gather here several weeks ago and share a drink as well as BBQ some food. As the sun went down it was good to reflect on what a lovely village we live in.

For those intrepid, long standing allotmenteers who have cultivated their plots over the years, despite the sea of weeds and the piles of junk, a big thank you. If you hadn’t battled on regardless then the allotments could have been in real jeopardy.

Finally, and probably most importantly of all, it is wonderful to report that more and more allotments are being cultivated. Ever since I began reporting on the refurbishment of the allotments I have always included an invitation to everyone out there to take on an allotment. I think it is beginning to pay off. Once abandoned land is now being put to good use by villagers and from folk in the surrounding area. It is so heartening to see this change in fortune, and whilst we’d never want to deny anyone an allotment, wouldn’t it be an achievement to say that we had a waiting list!

So here we go again…If you are interested in trying out an allotment (you can have a small “taster plot” free for one year – or you can plunge straight in and select a more permanent plot that suits you) then contact either Sue Corner on 01327 342124 or Lynda Eales on 01327 341707.

Come and join us.

Mike Langrish

2020 Village Award Scheme – October 2019

2020 Village Award Scheme
(organised by ACRE – Action for Communities in Rural England)

My husband and I came to Nether Heyford for 18 months in 1987 and have been here ever since, having realised what a great community this was. It still is – with a wide variety of activities going on around the village, many based in the village hall, in the school, on the sports field, in the churches, in the youth club and on the village green. In addition, I have recently been inspired by the fact that next year marks the 60th anniversary of the building of the village hall, built entirely by volunteers – and throughout the ensuing 60 years, volunteers have continued to manage and maintain it.

With these two facts, we could stand a good chance of being recognised as a very special village community.

As a villager myself and appreciative of all that Nether Heyford has to offer, I would be pleased to co-ordinate an application, with the help of others. To this end, I propose to contact and, I hope, meet representatives of the various activities. If I contact you, please be gentle with me.

The application deadline will be next April, with judging from late May to early June. That seems a long time ahead but, with Christmas and New Year in between, we need to make an early start.

Alwyne Wilson

Village Hall – News – October 2019

Pantomime
Following the ‘packed house’ success of last year’s pantomime, we are looking forward to this year’s production: ‘Dick Whittington’ to be presented by The Looking Glass Theatre Company in the Village Hall on Sunday 29th December at 2pm. We’re already receiving requests for tickets so we advise you to book early before they sell out again. Tickets – £9 for adults, £3 for children up to age 11. They can be purchased from:

Richard 01327 341044 or 07801 862 140, Alwyne 01327 340803.

Fete Photographs
Tom Dodd, our voluntary photographer has produced a large, colourful montage of this year’s fete, which is now displayed in the village hall. He’s happy to provide individual photographs – no charge but a donation to the fete funds would be welcomed. Contact him on: 07887 743157.

Village Hall Secretary
Following our recent invitation for a new Secretary, we are delighted to welcome two: Judith Cattermole as management committee secretary, and Pat Paterson as our new special events secretary. As next year sees the 60th anniversary of the building of the village hall, we expect to be even busier than usual, so our two new secretaries will make a valuable contribution to our team.

Alwyne Wilson