Parish Council – September 2019 Meeting

Nether_Heyford_Parish_Council_2019

The July 1st meeting was held as normal in the  Baptist Chapel Schoolroom.

Like all Council meetings it was open to the public.

PCSO. It was resolved that the employment of the PCSO would be continued for the time being, provided that Bugbrooke PC continued with their share of the arrangement, which has proved to be the case since our meeting. The PCSO is felt to have fitted well into the village and is making contacts with residents and businesses.

Car Parking on the Green. This has again become an issue with both Councillors and other residents complaining of vehicles being parked on the Green. This is felt to be unnecessary and unsightly and spoils the enjoyment of our magnificent Green for many residents. Council would be most grateful if those responsible would stop.

Lighting. It was reported that a start had been made on the plan to renew lighting. A brief needed to be written to send to lighting companies willing to quote.

Roads and pavements. Condition of Street Name Signs for The Peak and Manor Walk to be reported to SNC as the black paint needed to be restored.

The Green and Play Area. It was felt that the Play Area was in reasonable condition at the present, but that it would need refurbishment after winter. Clerk had attended a course run by the Open Spaces Society, and had been told that if the property behind Denbrook on Weedon Rd were to put in a planning application, then an Easement in order to allow access across the section of the Village Green would be necessary. Council should ask that this be a condition of the planning permission, and ensure that the applicant paid for it.

Fair. It was resolved to allow Mr Freeman’s fair to visit on the Middle Green from Sept 12 – 15.

Playing Fields. Mr Thorneycroft reported that the container for the Scouts and School was now in place. He had been told that the proposed Basketball/Netball court could not go ahead until an archaeological investigation was undertaken, Mr Thorneycroft had arranged this but would have to pay for the hire and fuel for a digger. Council agreed to pay for the digger costs.

Trees. A Robinia on Hillside Crescent had been damaged, and STS asked to deal with it. A Robinia on the Green would need to be removed because of rotting. The Limes would be pollarded after the leaves had fallen.

Allotments. It was reported that further expenditure had taken place on the shed, and more to come regarding a pond. H&S issues would be considered with regard to the pond and other water holding tanks; a risk assessment would be needed.

Footpaths. There had been clearance and strimming work carried out by the Rights of Way team.

Churchyard. The first internment of Ashes had taken place. It was likely that there would be a request for funds to help with re-roofing the Church after the theft of lead.

Canal. The railing had been re-painted on the bridge on Furnace Lane. Chair thanked Lee Pratt and Nick Essex for their continued work on behalf of the community.

Youth Club. To start back on 9th September, with a waiting list in operation. Anglian Water had repaired damaged drains.

Defibrillators. Both inspected and in working order.

Neighbourhood Plan (NP). It was reported that discussions had been held with SNC, who felt the criteria used for the chosen housing areas were not robust enough, and a further Housing Needs Survey needed to be carried out, as the Examiner might well take that part of the policy out if it were felt unsatisfactory. The NP was not as close to the consultation as had been thought. It was now felt that the NP would not be complete until 2021, but that it would be much safer with the additional work done.

Reporting Highway and Footpath Issues. The Clerk will report issues that Council is made aware of, but Council would encourage residents to use the FixMyStreet service to report issues themselves as there will then be no time lag and first-hand reports are almost always better than 2nd or 3rd hand reports. The service can be found here: www.fixmystreet.com 

It is easy to use; you can have your own account and can check up on any issues you have reported.

Council meetings take place on the first Monday of each month (unless there is a Bank Holiday) – the next one being on Monday October 7th.

Clerk to the Parish Council: Guy Ravine, c/o Old Dairy Farm, Upper Stowe, Weedon, Northamptonshire, NN7 4SH
Telephone: 07935 931787
Email: netherheyfordparishcouncil@gmail.com

Next Meeting
The next Parish Council meeting will be on the first Monday of the month at the Baptist Chapel Schoolroom at 7.30 pm and is, like all Parish Council meetings, open to all Parishioners.

For further useful information about Nether Heyford Parish Council and full contact details for the clerk and the councillors please visit our Nether Heyford Parish Council page.

Parish Church of St. Peter & St. Paul – March 2019

Nether Heyford Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul

Dear Friends

As a child, I remember I had a large, furry teddy bear, imaginatively called Ted! Ted had been pre-loved, handed down to me from another family member, and he was a little worn. If I was lucky, when I turned Ted upside down, he would emit a low growl, but that didn’t always happen, as his growler was a bit hit and miss. Nevertheless, Ted was much loved, and a constant companion through my childhood years.

Maybe you or your children (or your grandchildren) have a similar soft toy. Loved when it first arrives, perhaps as a gift from a favourite relative, the soft toy becomes a firm favourite; a regular honoured guest at the pretend tea party, a travelling companion on every family outing and holiday, and always there at bedtime. Over time, of course, such a much-loved, well-used soft toy begins to show signs of wear. Its once vibrant colours become a little grubby, its fur becomes threadbare, its seams split, and stuffing leaks out. Quick running repairs with a needle and thread, plus occasional visits to the washing machine perhaps keep the toy together and clean. Even so, ragged, grubby and patched up as it might be, that soft toy is greatly loved. Other toys and dolls might come and go, but like my Ted, the special soft toy remains the favourite, the real focus of affection.

As human beings, we’re rather like that ragged, grubby soft toy. We are all of us flawed, wounded, broken and hurt, whether by the things that happen to us in life, or our own missteps and wrongdoings. The Christian season of Lent, which begins on Ash Wednesday, 6th March, is a chance to pause and reflect on our own raggedness, and take some time for self-examination and self-denial. And it’s an opportunity to clean up our act, and make some running repairs, maybe giving up some unhelpful habits, and taking up others that will renew us as we go on with our lives.

But it’s worth remembering that God knows us in all our raggedness, and he loves us anyway. The Bible tells us that we are made in God’s image, the crowning glory of his creation. Raggedness is not our identity, nor is our destiny. God loves us just the way we are – ragged and careworn as we may be – but he loves us too much to leave us that way.

Yours in Christ,

Stephen – 01327 344436

The Streets we shall be praying for during March are: Close Rd, The Pound and The Peak in Heyford, The Avenue and The Glebe in Flore, The Old Dairy Farm in Upper Stowe and the outlying farms around Stowe and the Mews Houses in Brockhall.