The Story of Heyford (Extra): Sheep Dipping in the early days at Whitehall Farm – Hugh Adams

Sheep Dipping in the early days at Whitehall Farm

We used to take the sheep to be dipped at Upper Heyford. Jack Perkin and I would leave the buildings at Whitehall Farm around 1pm with 40 sheep, driving them along the road towards Heyford. We would pass High House Wharf where the West family (Coal Merchants) lived. On the right side of the road would be the house on the bridge where Ted Grey and his wife Ellen lived. Carrying on down the hill on the right by the side of the canal and past Mr and Mrs Fry (he was a carpenter) following on down the road towards the village, on the left the French family (now Adrian Hayes) – past the Cemetery – down the hill on the right, the Johnson family.

We are now in the village and on the left was Sid Eales shoe mending hut, past the little green. We would pass on the right the Butchers shop kept by Sid Capel (now Glen). We had to keep an eye on the sheep at this point otherwise they would escape down Church Street!! Next was Chapel Cottage, Mrs George. David Browning kept the shop, past the Foresters Arms, the landlord was Tom Rolfe. Now the sheep would take to the green where there was lots of good grass! Turn left into Middle Street past the School and School House where Mr Carrington, the headmaster lived with his wife and 6 children. Next to the Sun Inn was the Farmhouse, Mr and Mrs Will Smith, past Bens Orchard (full of Apple Trees), now it was plain sailing on the way to Upper Heyford.

Our destination was Dovecote Farm where Mr Cosford would be expecting us. The sheep would be put through the dipping bath. This would take about one or two hours. After a cup of tea and then the journey home with two tired men and a very wet dog called Nell. She had been dipped too.

Hugh Adams

Letter published in The Prattler – March 2020

 

The Story of Heyford (Extra): Village Hall 60th Anniversary #2 – Tony Wright

Village Hall 60th Anniversary in 2020

On 25th August 2003, the team assembled under the leadership of Christine Metcalfe, the Village Hall Chairman. It was split into two groups, door and windows were fitted by Dave Juland, who was also the Foreman., Brian May, Ralph Faulkner and Hughie Taylor. Tea was made and served by Ray Metcalfe who was in trouble if late. Cladding and insulation was fitted by Jim Williamson and Tony Wright assisted by Sally Sargent. Everyone brought sandwiches for lunch apart from Ralph who went home for a cooked meal. Very welcome cakes were provided by Jean Spokes, Rene Gilkes, Mary Hyde and Maureen Wright.

The old cladding was removed, and insulation batts cut to size and fitted followed by the new cladding. Peter Perkin kindly left a trailer every morning and took away the rubbish at night. Joan Juland looked after the curtains. The working day was 9am to 5:30-6:00 pm Monday to Friday. By the end of the first week, seven windows had been fitted and clad. The second week saw the remaining windows fitted and the cladding completed. Beading was fitted around the windows on the inside and on the Friday, the job was finished when Joan Juland and Marion Williamson re-hung the curtains. All agreed it was a most satisfying project.

Tony Wright

Letter published in The Prattler – February 2020

 

The Story of Heyford (Extra): Village Hall 60th Anniversary #1 – Doreen Faulkner

Village Hall 60th Anniversary in 2020

In answer to your question about the 60th Anniversary of the Village Hall, I can tell you my late husband, Ralph Faulkner, was one of the many keen volunteers who built it. There was a lot of skilled workers in the building trade and those who weren’t worked hard doing the labouring. It wasn’t only men who worked; the ladies did their bit too. I remember Ralph’s sister, Eileen Boyes, made all the first lot of curtains on her little hand Singer sewing machine while I looked after her children. I can’t remember many of their names now, 60 years ago is quite a long time, but I can still remember them and how hard they all worked; men and women together. Unfortunately a lot of them are not with us anymore.

In later years Ralph was on the village hall committee and he still enjoyed doing small maintenance jobs on the hall. The last big job that I can remember was taking the old windows out and replacing them with double glazing, that was done voluntarily by Dave Juland, Ray Metcalfe, Jim Williamson, Ralph Faulkner and I’m sure there was someone else but I’m so sorry I can’t think who it was. Joan Juland and Chris Metcalfe went to the hall to make them cups of tea to keep them working. It is a hall to be proud of, myself and my family have had many happy hours in there. I hope the future generations in this village will continue to take care of it and enjoy using it, like us village people always have.

I am the last person to live in one of the ex council houses in Hillside Crescent since they were built in 1952.

Doreen Faulkner

Letter published in The Prattler – February 2020

 

The Story of Heyford (Extra): Dear Diary – February 1950

February 1950

Dear Diary,

What fun. When I opened my curtains this morning I saw the fields all covered in snow. It was like looking at a late Christmas card. In February 1947 it almost reached the tops of the telegraph poles and they had to dig their way out of the houses.

After breakfast I walked down the village with Mum to see Nan. Her house is draughty and the windows get iced up in the bathroom; not that she ever has a bath because it’s full of apples from Pap’s orchard put there to last through until next autumn. She should stay in the living room where she has a Rayburn.

We went to the shop down Church Street, not the little thatched post office which they talk about pulling down. I love looking at the rows of sweets in jars in the window. Sometimes Nan buys me two penn’oth but she hasn’t got enough change left today. Next time maybe. ‘Course, it could be that she hasn’t forgiven me for taking the pig for a walk down the street last week. She followed me, banging on the bucket which holds the pig swill, trying to persuade the pig home for tea. His, not ours.

Somebody’s in the phone box by the green. It must be an emergency like doctor or fire brigade. Well, who else would you call – nobody I know has a phone. Let’s hope they get a reply. Still, if nobody answers they can push button B and get their money back. I bet the boys will be in there later just to check, Well, tuppence is tuppence.

The snow soon melted. Good job because I can see the men putting up the goal posts ready for a football match this afternoon. They keep them in a shed at The Foresters Arms. They can’t really leave them on the green or the boys would be swinging on them. Perhaps we’ll come and watch. I like to hear the money rattling in the collection tin that someone brings round at half time. Most of the village turn out to watch and it can be a fun afternoon.

Nan isn’t very well. We could ask the doctor to call when he does his morning rounds but she says she’s not that ill, or, as it’s Saturday she could go and see him when he comes to a house in Close Road. She won’t go though because she says everybody gets to know your business there. I’m not keen on going either because you have to sit in a lady’s kitchen and wait your turn, then go into her front room to see him. By that time either somebody has decided how to cure your illness or they’ve had it themselves.

I brought a note home from school last week asking who would be interested in a
day trip to Hunstanton in the summer and mum and dad are going to talk about it
tonight. It says we would leave at 7 o’clock in the morning and get home very late. I’d love to go to the seaside, my first trip ever, and I’m 5.

We’re going home now to light the fire for when dad comes home for dinner. I can play with my colouring book while mum cooks the sausages she bought at the butchers. I hope she makes an apple pie for pudding with some of pap’s apples. Blimey, my tummy’s rumbling.

Polly

Letter published in The Prattler – February 2020

 

2020 Village Award Scheme – Update – February 2020

2020 Village Award Scheme
(organised by ACRE – Action for Communities in Rural England)

Nether Heyford’s Application

Following my mention of this in the October Prattler, in preparation for our application, I have been researching all that Nether Heyford has to offer to its community.

The results are staggering – in a village of 1750 people we have some 50 groups, organisations, activities and facilities all offering direct benefits, not only to our own people but to those of neighbouring villages.

But a list is not enough – I now need specific details of how all these benefits are offered and received. To this end, I am about to ask each group to help me by completing a brief questionnaire. As it’s going to take me some time to get around everyone, you may not hear from me immediately. When you do, I hope you will provide a picture of the all good work that you are doing.

The application deadline is tight – the end of February. In April or May the judges will visit our village to talk to groups and view the facilities. I do hope that, if invited, you will be willing to join a small group of Heyford people to meet the judges and help convince them what a marvelous community we have in our village. Awards will be announced in July.

In advance of your support, thank you.

Alwyne Wilson 01327 340803
(Village Awards Co-ordinator: self-volunteered)

 

Letters: Money in your pocket – February 2020

Parking

In a recent Martin Lewis Money programme on ITV he reminded any married couple or partnership in which one partner is a 20% tax payer whilst their partner either does not pay tax or utilise their full personnel allowance,currently at £1250, should apply to transfer the unused tax allowance to their partner. This can be back dated to April 2015 and currently amounts up to a maximum of £250 for the current tax year. Simply contact the Office of Works and Pensions and provide both partners details in order to your claim.

In addition anybody who has taken out a Lasting Power of Attorney, LPA or Enduring Power of Attorney, EPA between 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2017 are entitled to refunds varying from £34 to £54 for each attorney dependent on the date of completion. Separate refunds are available whether cover is for property/financial or health/welfare. Closure date for applications is 1 February 2021. So far over £11M has been paid out. You can claim if you are a donor or attorney. If the donor has died then the executor of the will can claim. Claims can be made to the Office of the Public Guardian by phone 0300 456 0300 selecting option 6 or fill in on-line form. If successful payment will be received within 12 weeks.

I personally have successfully completed claims and received multiple refunds.

James Arnold

Published February Edition 2020